Winfield Farm . Washington, New Jersey

Established 1992

Established in 1992, Rosie'’s Petites at Winfield Farms in Washington, New Jersey, breeds excellent quality, uniquely marked Olde English Babydoll sheep. They're registered in the Olde English Babydoll registry by Robert Mock. Spring lambs are here and will be weaned and ready to move to their new homes late May- early June. All lambs had their tails docked (banded) their first week. They will be current with their CD&T vaccinations and wormer. Health certificates are available upon request.

Autumn

Autumn

This might happen if they’re challenging each other of food. Their other aggressive move is stomping their front foot. Yes, it’s as adorable as it sounds.  This occurs when they feel threatened (by a predator or anyone too close to their lambs).


2019 Lamb Video

Wool: Their wool is one of the finest wools of all the British breeds.  It is short (typically 1.5 to 2.5 inches) and springy, soft and bouncy, with a surprisingly strong underlying disposition.  The micron count typically ranges from 24 to 29. 

"Autumn"  Born Sept 22nd 2018

Coming this Spring  Lambs For Sale

                       al rights reserved 2019

WEBSITE DESIGN BY David KALTENBACH PRODUCTIONS

Rosie's Petites

Past LAMBS

Cell 908.482.0972

Fax  908.835.0489

Rare & Beautiful!



What is a Babydoll? ­


Olde English “Babydoll” Sheep are wonderful pets.They’re gentle, curious and intelligent. They love to interact with other animals and “their” people. They’re flock animals so they should never be singled out.  They’re perfect additions for local buyers looking for farm assessment status. The recent trend in agriculture–smaller acreage– gives the Babydolls an important place in the new rural lifestyle, too.












Organic Gardeners: They are fuel-efficient lawn mowers who keep enclosed areas looking tidy. They leave the grounds well groomed and fertilized–they spread small pellets over the newly trimmed grass as they go–doesn’t get more organic than that! They’re perfect weeders for vineyards and fruit and berry orchards, too–they don’t harm the fruits, girdle trunks of trees, shrubs.

Companion animals: They’re great companion animals for other non-aggressive livestock.  Their calm, docile disposition has a soothing effect on other livestock. They should not be kept with intact male llamas or alpacas who may attempt breeding with them. It is wise to introduce them gradually to other livestock by putting them in separate paddocks when they first arrive to their new home.










 It has more barbs per inch than other wool types, making it an ideal blend with either angora rabbit or angora goat for spinners.  Its ability to felt is very low.

Hardiness: They are small (and oh so cute) but they’re hardy. They are an ancient breed which means they are less prone to many of the problems associated with modern breeds. They are resistant to foot rot and intestinal parasites. They’re great foragers (see: organic gardeners above) and do well on a small amount of quality hay.

Care and Keeping : They have a strong flocking instinct, so they don’t wander. Good fences are essential, more for protection from predators than containment– Babydolls do not challenge fences. Their life span is around 15 to 20 years. They’re short, but stout.  Babydolls have two aggressive moves. One is, quite simply, a head-butt.  They are naturally polled (this means they don’t have horns) so it’s actually butting heads.